Saturday, December 7, 2013



just in from watching "the Hunger Games" with my 11 year old son. Okay - officially - "Catching Fire." They did a brilliant job. I am so pleased that the characters received a little more depth. And that they are evolving. I love how Peeta's character become something more, both in the book and on screen.  In the first book I was completely at a loss and with the movie even more so, because you do just know that Peeta is going to get this girl that is Gale's. And it drives you nuts - the baker's boy vs the man.  (hmm. I suppose that says a lot about me doesn't it?) but even having read all three books the whole triangle thing that the capitol created - Katniss never gets to win. She looses so much personally.  I love in this movie how they show the distress and the anger and things that I worried were too subtle in the book for the kids to pick up on.  Myself as a 12 year old reader would sort of gloss over the lessons to get to the action.  And so I worry, are they reading this book?  Do they see the manipulations and the anxiety?  The nightmares?  The nightmares are real.  Do the kids get that the worst part of all of this is that the game maker gets into their head and even if they survive they never get to win?  Do they see how this is changing the characters?  And how some are growing and some are being broken.  Do they see how Katniss is becoming something she never wanted to become?  And she can't leave so the has to chose and it isn't a choice she wanted to make.

And the costume and make-up design. Brilliant. So well done. Really. Love it.


5 comments:

troutbirder said...

I haven't seen these movies or read the books so I can't really judge any of it. I had assumed the violence was inappropriate for children???

CailinMarie said...

hmm. so they are violent: the storyline is that in a post apocalyptic type setting "the capitol" controls 12 districts and keeps them in line by demanding "tributes" each year who fight to the death televised much like reality t.v. So yes, violent. But not blow by blow violent. And my oldest is currently reading "Lord of the Flies" in H.S. and is shuddering and more disturbed by that book than when she read "Hunger Games" a year or two ago. I haven't read "Lord of the Flies" and need to so I can compare. I find that tweens and teens relate to the lack of control. The teens in the Hunger Games are not in control of their lives, adults are. And the adults are making questionable choices with little morality if any morality guiding them. I think the current generation of teens and tweens can relate to that.

CailinMarie said...

I'm also going to add that it depends on the age, maturity level, and sensitivity of the child. My younger 3 have not watched these movies. The 15 yr old, 13 yr old and 11 yr old have. My 11 yr old I worried about initially, he is impulsive and doesn't always seem to take responsibility for his actions but he gets these books better than I expected to. He particularly relates to choices being made by adults that he did not agree with and doing his best to remain true to himself despite the circumstances he might find himself in.

CailinMarie said...

wow. grammar on that last comment! I hope you can infer what I intended to write.

troutbirder said...

Thanks CM. I t appears you've made a careful judgment on the matter. My 7th grade grandson has also read the book and seen the movie with his parents. His younger sister and brother have not. Don't worry about the spelling and grammar. My English teacher spouse gives me a lot of advice on the matter but I attribute any clunkers to my lack of keyboard skills...:)